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Title Management overview
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Title Is there a cure? Title

Unfortunately, there is no cure for epilepsy and an epileptic dog will always be at risk of having a seizure. Yet, treatment can be very successful, most often resulting in reduced frequency, duration or severity of seizures, but sometimes stopping the seizures from occurring altogether.

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Title Can I do anything to prevent epilepsy?
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There are some measures that can be taken to reduce the incidence of canine epilepsy. If you have an epileptic dog or bitch, it would be unwise to breed from them or repeat the mating that produced them, as there is thought to be a strong hereditary factor with epilepsy.

Additionally, as the frequency of seizures of a female epileptic dog can increase around the time of her season, it may be advisable to have her spayed.

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Title Why should epilepsy be treated?
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Seizures can be both upsetting and inconvenient for the owners of an epileptic dog, but most dogs enjoy a high quality of life when treated. In addition to the obvious distress to yourself when you witness a seizure, there are sound medical reasons for treating epilepsy. The time your dog spends in a seizure can cause damage or loss of brain cells and may lead to an alteration of personality over time. Also, each time a seizure occurs, the likelihood of the dog having additional seizures increases.

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Title When should epilepsy be treated? Title

This should be discussed with your veterinary surgeon, but some guidelines for treatment are:
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lf seizures occur more frequently than once every 4 - 6 weeks.
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If seizures occur in clusters (several in one day) or are very severe.
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If seizures last longer than 5 - 10 minutes.
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If there is undesirable behaviour following seizures (eg. aggression)
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If seizures are increasing in frequency and/or severity
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If there is an underlying progressive problem.

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Title What can I expect from treatment? Title

Each dog responds differently to anticonvulsant therapy. Although complete elimination of seizures is desirable, it is not always possible.
Treatment is considered to be successful where seizures are reduced in frequency, duration and/or severity.

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Remember: most true epileptic dogs can live a long and happy life. However, treatment should not be altered without prior consultation with your veterinary surgeon and it is essential that your dog receives the treatment prescribed.
 
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This site is created for educational and monitoring purposes only. The owners of the site are not legally able to discuss individual cases and for individual case advice and further information on epilepsy please contact your veterinary surgeon.This site is created by Vetoquinol, manufacturers of Epiphen® Epiphen® contains phenobarbital. Epiphen® is a prescription only medicine, legal category POM-V. Further information is available on request from: Vetoquinol UK Limited, Vetoquinol House, Great Slade, Buckingham Industrial Park, Buckingham, MK18 1PA. For specific advice on your animal please contact your veterinary surgeon. This site is designed for use by veterinary professionals and owners of dogs using Epiphen.

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Need more information on the condition?: visit www.canineepilepsy.co.uk as a pet owner, the prospect of a lifetime of medical care for your pet can be a daunting prospect. This site provides advice and printable factsheets with links to epilepsy support networks, a vital part of ensuring continuing care for this chronic condition to help you care for your pet in the best way possible.

Canine Epilepsy

     
 
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